CollegeAmerica is an Accredited Institution

about collegeamerica

Education Quality

CollegeAmerica has made a commitment to uphold ethical standards of trust, honesty, fairness, and consistency. Our integrity is based on these values, and meeting these standards enables us to maintain our status of accreditation. We believe that our staff and faculty are accountable to the postsecondary-education community and to members of the public. When students earn a degree from CollegeAmerica, they can feel confident about their credentials.

Continual Improvement

With our mission to educate working professionals in the most valuable, relevant way possible, CollegeAmerica makes a concerted effort to stay up to date with career trends, employment opportunities, and current technology. A main focus for our school is ensuring that our students receive the training they need for success. We help students prepare for future success whether they're launching their careers or increasing their current professional status.

Education Quality

CollegeAmerica has made a commitment to uphold ethical standards of trust, honesty, fairness, and consistency. Our integrity is based on these values, and meeting these standards enables us to maintain our status of accreditation. We believe that our staff and faculty are accountable to the postsecondary-education community and to members of the public. When students earn a degree from CollegeAmerica, they can feel confident about their credentials.

Institutional Accreditation

ACCSCTo measure quality of education and operations, colleges and universities are measured against standards of accreditation. CollegeAmerica is accredited by the ACCSC (Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges). Accrediting agencies regularly assess colleges in areas such as accountability, integrity, communication, and ongoing improvement. These agencies make sure that the colleges they oversee continuously provide high standards of education.

More About Accreditation

As an industry, postsecondary education is highly regulated. The methods for regulating higher education include accreditation, state regulatory and licensing, and federal requirements as established by the Higher Education Act of 1965 Title IV.

While accreditation is the oldest method of regulation, it's also the least widely understood. The word accreditation comes from the Latin term credito, which means "to trust." Educational institutions are accredited for two main reasons: 1) assurance of quality, and 2) self-improvement of the institution and its program. Accrediting agencies periodically review institutions to make sure they maintain a certain level of performance, to seek evidence of self-improvement, and to ensure their integrity and their conformity to the agency's standards.

By recognizing the quality of postsecondary institutions and their programs, accreditation builds confidence in the higher-education community and the constituencies of each school. A college's accreditation helps other colleges, students, their parents, and their potential employers assess the quality of the college and its programs. In order for a student to receive federal financial aid, the college must be accredited by an agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education.